Rio 2016 Gymnast Breaks Leg in Horrifying Olympics Moment

It was the landing felt around the world. Yesterday, French gymnast Samir Ait Said broke his leg in a horrifying moment that serves as an early low point for Rio 2016, with the image of his snapped tibia causing viewers worldwide to squirm in revulsion.

Said, who was a gold medalist in the 2013 European Championships, was forced to leave the stadium on a stretcher following what will inevitably become one of the most heavily replayed moments of the competition. We’ve included photos and video footage of the incident below, but be warned – we’re veering into NSFL territory here, so if you’re reading this while eating your morning bowl of cereal, you may want to rethink that choice. 

Stopped eating? Good. 

Said’s fortunes took a turn for the worse during the qualifying rounds of the men’s vault, which began with an otherwise stand run-up to the apparatus.

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Credit: Scott Halleran / Getty Images

Said performed a rotation in mid-air. So far, so good. No leg-breaking here, just solid gymnastic skills. But then…

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Credit: Scott Halleran / Getty Images

…oh. Oh God. Oh God no.

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Credit: Alex Livesey / Getty Images

NO. PLEASE STOP. LEGS AREN’T MEANT TO BEND LIKE THAT, WHY IS IT BENDING LIKE THAT?

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Credit: Scott Halleran / Getty Images

Yeah, that’s it, tracksuit man – put your hand on his chest. That’s clearly the issue here, not his wonky leg that looks like it’s hanging on by a thread. While you’re at it, why don’t you check his temperature?

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Credit: Scott Halleran / Getty Images

Said was then stretchered out of the arena, in a moment that serves as a reminder that even the sports that are seemingly the most harmless can have terrifying ramifications.

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Credit: Alex Livesey / Getty Images

So remember, kids: don’t play sports, because if you do and get so good at them that you become a professional, you risk snapping your leg in front of millions of people in Rio de Janeiro. 

Top Image: Scott Halleran / Getty Images